Literature

Movie Dr. Strangelove Review

Dr. Strangelove (1964)

Cast: Peter Sellers, George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden
Director: Stanley Kubrick

Synopsis: One man. One button to nuclear destruction. Burpelson Air Force Base’s Brigadier General Jack D. Ripper has the power to deploy a nuclear catastrophe to the Soviet Union due to the belief that it has its own scheme of destroying the US population by the fluoridation of the American water supply.

Since only he knows the code to deactivate the attack, General Buck Turgidson and President Merkin Muffley struggle to end what has started as a birth to a nuclear holocaust.

Review:

While watching great films, the story is always a stand out. However, for Dr. Strangelove, it is not just about the story line, the actors or the cinematography but rather concludes that face acting matters and George C. Scott just performed it with pure perfection! The cast of Dr. Strangelove are wearing the masks that could tickle the funny bones. It’s not surprising at all for its director, Kubrick, has been a legendary conductor of films specializing in machines, logic and all “American Doomsday” approach; and such talent is a scarcity in the industry at present.

As a matter of fact, just right after the first blast, the film doesn’t need a dialogue at all for the motion picture’s actions after that and the gestures of the characters could run a movie but still conveys the clear message to its viewers.

Overall, Dr. Strangelove is a whole basket of treats. It makes you laugh, react, surprise, thrilled and – most importantly – think at the end of the day. The movie has an excellent script, stunning characters, and natural dialogue. It is simply one piece of a perfect form of art.

At the same time, Kubrick’s film can be considered a realistic caricature. The Soviet ambassador, the Nazi scientist in Pentagon, the cheeky American generals, the commander of the B-52 (a simple Texas guy, riding a nuclear bomb instead of a horse) – all these characters are incredibly realistic. The script from Stanley Kubrick and Terry Southern has completely stripped the heroes of patriotism and other high sense, leaving only uniforms and great names. You won’t find a positive character here – even those who have not completely lost the last vestige of humanity look off-putting.

The set design of Dr. Strangelove is no less unique than the acting. The famous command post (Pentagon War Room), where the film’s American government is sitting, still looks impressive. The cockpit area of the aircraft was created from photographs taken from aviation magazines. While the movie was filmed in three main sound stages, the designers and director have put much effort to make it realistic.

The film remains relevant, despite the fact that the Cold War ended in 1991. The situation has not changed much: the threat is still strong, mutual hostility remains high, and the arms race still continues. The current situation helps to reveal the full potential of the film, find new implications, and see the entire philosophical depth. It turns out that despite its age, the film is one of the most relevant today.

Comment (1)

  1. Pianino Aplikacja
    April 13, 2021 Reply

    My friend and I were just talking about this specific subject, she actually is normally attempting to prove me completely wrong! I am about to show her this blog post and additionally rub it in a little!

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